Music Therapy Services

 

We offer group, individual and co-treatment music therapy sessions. We specialize in working with children and teens with autism, but do offer services to adults as well…and we truly love what we do!

As of July 1, 2017, music therapy services and adapted music lessons provided by our board certified music therapists can be covered by the Gardiner Scholarship Program. This is exciting news! Send us an email to get more information.

Read on to find out which music therapy offering is the best fit for your son or daughter or click here to send an email inquiry about our services.

 
Sing, Speak & Socialize

We are currently offering two sessions of our music therapy group!

Sing, Speak, & Socialize for children ages 4 – 6
When: Mondays 3:30 – 4:15pm
Where: Orange Blossom Learning Center, 6710 SW 80th St, South Miami, FL 33143

Sing, Speak, & Socialize for children ages 7 – 10
When: Mondays 5:00 – 5:45pm
Where:Orange Blossom Learning Center, 6710 SW 80th St, South Miami, FL 33143

Group MTY

Here are some examples of musical experiences we use during our group sessions:

  • Social songs teach proper social greetings and recognition of emotions. Sessions also include multiple opportunities for socialization through group instrument playing when children are prompted to play together, take turns, and share instruments.
  • Singing experiences work on expressive language, vocabulary, articulation, and breath control.
  • Book ‘n Songs may be used to facilitate speech therapy goals, such as identification of pictures and speaking 3-4 word utterances (i.e. “turn the page” and specific phrases in the story). Songs can also be used to prompt speaking in a complete sentence. Click here to watch a video of the song “What is Your Name? Woah!” as an example.
  • Movement to music with props allows your child to work together with other group members to move the parachute or stretchy band and follow directions (“move in and out…move up and down,” “shake fast…shake slow!”)
  • Instrument playing with maracas, rhythm sticks, xylophone and drums target sustained attention, direction following, and bilateral coordination.
  • Academic songs are written to teach specific concepts on your child’s IEP, such as identifying colors, letters, numbers, or shapes. Click here to watch a video of an original song that facilitates matching numeral and quantity. 

All music therapy activities target specific goals and objectives and are designed to foster social interaction between all group members. Group music therapy sessions are designed with group goals in mind, but do target individual needs as well. If you are interested in signing your child up for Sing, Speak, & Socialize Music Therapy or if you would like more information, click on the icon below. We’d love to hear from you!

 Click here to sign up for services

Individual Music Therapy

15Individual sessions provide the opportunity for the music therapist to work one-on-one with your child to achieve specific, functional goals.

The music therapist will determine treatment goals based on an evaluation session and the IEP (Individualized Education Plan) where applicable.

A variety of engaging musical experiences are used during our sessions. Each experience is tailored to the strengths and needs of your child.

Here are some examples of musical experiences we use during our sessions:

  • Book ‘n Songs may be used to facilitate speech therapy goals, such as identification of pictures and speaking 3-4 word utterances (i.e. “turn the page” and specific phrases in the story). Songs can also be used to prompt speaking in a complete sentence. Click here to watch a video of the song “What is Your Name? Woah!”
  • Playing the gathering drum with a mallet may be used to facilitate grasping, crossing midline, bilateral coordination, and full extension of the arms.
  • Songs to teach academic concepts like rhyming words, letter sounds, and identification of numerals may be used as mnemonic devices to help children remember and recall the information. “Chunking” (grouping information into smaller units) and repetition allow the information to be remembered and recalled more easily. Click here to listen to my original “Days of the Week” Song!
  • Social songs can be used to teach children proper social greetings (such as giving high gives and shaking hands) and how to respond in various social situations. Click here to listen to my original song “What Do You Do?”
  • Songwriting may be used to facilitate self-expression and encourage communication. Your child may then have the opportunity to sing and/or play instruments, record the song on Garageband, and have it burned onto a CD to take home.
  • Movement to music to work on identification of body parts (“Wiggle your fingers!”) and facilitate gross motor movement (“Move your arms up and down!”). Click here to listen to my original “Feet, Feet” song as an example.”

Click here to watch our collection of Music Therapy in ACTION videos! You’ll have the opportunity to view music therapy sessions (all shared with permission) and see how each musical experience addresses specific goals & objectives.

Click here to sign up for services

 

Co-Treatment Sessions

33Music therapy co-treatment sessions can be set up with your child’s speech, occupational, physical, or ABA therapist on a one-time or recurring basis.

Music therapy can support these therapies by providing engaging musical interventions to address the following goals:

Speech therapy: To increase expressive language, to improve articulation, to improve receptive language.

Occupational therapy: To improve fine motor skills, to work on sensory integration, to provide proprioceptive and vestibular input. Click here to watch videos of sensory integration experiences that incorporate music.

Physical therapy: To increase strength and endurance, to increase range of motion, to improve gross motor skills. Playing the gathering drum with a mallet may be used to facilitate grasping, crossing midline, bilateral coordination, and full extension of the arms.

Click here to sign up for services