14Aug
2013
4

Sensational Ideas for Working with Children with Autism (Part 4)

I just returned home after a beautiful and relaxing vacation in Sanibel.

Honestly it was hard to leave a week of swimming, biking, grilling, and swinging in the hammock. But I feel refreshed and ready to go!

This is a bittersweet week for me – I am finishing up my time at UCP’s Early Beginnings Academy. Wednesday is my last day! Then Thursday I start my new position as Professor of Music Therapy at University of Miami for the 2013-2014 school year!

As we move into fall, it’s time to wrap up my Summer Series on Sensory Integration + Music Therapy.

I hope the videos have sparked some new ideas for you.

Click to catch up and watch the videos from Part 1 (therapy ball), Part 2 (book + tactile stimulation with paint brushes), and Part 3 (gathering drum).

Now watch to see how I incorporate the trampoline into my sessions (make sure you watch all the way to the end!)

Here are a few things to take note of in the video:

– I’m using a highly preferred activity for this little girl (jumping on the trampoline) to encourage verbal and nonverbal communication (say and sign “more!”)

– The music helps structure the activity: the lyrics explain what she’s doing (“jump, jump, jump up and down”); the rhythm helps cue the jumping; the stop and go of the music help cue when she should be jumping (when the music is playing) and when she should stop (when the music stops).

ACTION TIME ya’ll!

Leave a comment below and let me know how you’ve been using the ideas from this series in your sessions.

Check out Sensational Songs & Activities E-Book for more sensory ideas, sheet music, & themed session plans:

Sensational Songs & Activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
*Please note all pictures and videos on this site are used with written parental consent*

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Comments (4)

  • Linda Jedrzejek

    Congrats on your new position, Amy! I hope you’ll continuing blogging and sharing your great intervention ideas!!!

    reply
    • Amy

      Thanks so much Linda!!! I will absolutely continue blogging. I’m keeping my private practice up and running, so I’ll still be immersed in music therapy practice – yay! Best of both worlds 🙂

      reply

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